Ionita SP-88 - History

Ionita SP-88 - History


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Ionita

A former name retained.

(SP~88; t.1;1.55';b.8'; dr.2'2";s.19k.;cpl.5)

Ionita (SP - 88), a motor yacht was built by Church Boat Works, Trenton, Mich., in i914; acquired by the Navy from ber owner, R. A. Newman of Detroit 16 August 1917 and commissioned 23 September 1917, WUliam W. Ford USNRF, in command.

Ionita was assigned to the 9th Naval District as a section patrol graft and spent the war on patrol in the Detroit River. After the Armistice, she was transferred to the Naval Training Camp, Detroit, and was later sold to William Thewes, Cleveland, Ohio, 20 November 1919.


Security and Privacy Controls for Information Systems and Organizations

See the Errata (beginning on p. xvii) for a list of updates to the original publication.

New supplemental materials are also available:

    (NEW)
    The entire security and privacy control catalog in spreadsheet format. Note: For a spreadsheet of control baselines, see the SP 800-53B details.
  • Analysis of updates between 800-53 Rev. 5 and Rev. 4 (Updated 1/22/21)
    Describes the changes to each control and control enhancement, provides a brief summary of the changes, and includes an assessment of the significance of the changes. Note that this comparison was authored by The MITRE Corporation for the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) and is being shared with permission by DNI.
  • Mapping of Appendix J Privacy Controls (Rev. 4) to Rev. 5
    Supports organizations using the privacy controls in Appendix J of SP 800-53 Rev. 4 that are transitioning to the integrated control catalog in Rev. 5.
  • Mappings between 800-53 Rev. 5 and other frameworks and standards (NIST Cybersecurity Framework and NIST Privacy Framework ISO/IEC 27001 [updated 1/22/21])
    The mappings provide organizations a general indication of SP 800-53 control coverage with respect to other frameworks and standards. When leveraging the mappings, it is important to consider the intended scope of each publication and how each publication is used organizations should not assume equivalency based solely on the mapping tables because mappings are not always one-to-one and there is a degree of subjectivity in the mapping analysis.
  • Security and Privacy Control Collaboration Index Template (Excel & Word)
    The collaboration index template supports information security and privacy program collaboration to help ensure that the objectives of both disciplines are met and that risks are appropriately managed. It is an optional tool for information security and privacy programs to identify the degree of collaboration needed between security and privacy programs with respect to the selection and/or implementation of controls in Rev. 5.

    Rev. 5 controls are provided using the Open Security Controls Assessment Language (OSCAL) currently available in JSON, XML, and YAML.

Author(s)

Joint Task Force

Abstract

This publication provides a catalog of security and privacy controls for information systems and organizations to protect organizational operations and assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation from a diverse set of threats and risks, including hostile attacks, human errors, natural disasters, structural failures, foreign intelligence entities, and privacy risks. The controls are flexible and customizable and implemented as part of an organization-wide process to manage risk. The controls address diverse requirements derived from mission and business needs, laws, executive orders, directives, regulations, policies, standards, and guidelines. Finally, the consolidated control catalog addresses security and privacy from a functionality perspective (i.e., the strength of functions and mechanisms provided by the controls) and from an assurance perspective (i.e., the measure of confidence in the security or privacy capability provided by the controls). Addressing functionality and assurance helps to ensure that information technology products and the systems that rely on those products are sufficiently trustworthy.

This publication provides a catalog of security and privacy controls for information systems and organizations to protect organizational operations and assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation from a diverse set of threats and risks, including hostile attacks, human errors, natural disasters, structural failures, foreign intelligence entities, and privacy risks. The controls are flexible and customizable and implemented as part of an organization-wide process to manage risk. The controls address diverse requirements derived from mission and business needs, laws, executive orders, directives, regulations, policies, standards, and guidelines. Finally, the consolidated control catalog addresses security and privacy from a functionality perspective (i.e., the strength of functions and mechanisms provided by the controls) and from an assurance perspective (i.e., the measure of confidence in the security or privacy capability provided by the controls). Addressing functionality and assurance helps to ensure that information technology products and the systems that rely on those products are sufficiently trustworthy.

Keywords

Control Families

Access Control Audit and Accountability Awareness and Training Configuration Management Contingency Planning Assessment, Authorization and Monitoring Identification and Authentication Incident Response Maintenance Media Protection Personnel Security Physical and Environmental Protection Planning Risk Assessment System and Services Acquisition System and Information Integrity System and Communications Protection Program Management PII Processing and Transparency Supply Chain Risk Management

Documentation

Other Parts of this Publication:
SP 800-53B

Document History:
12/10/20: SP 800-53 Rev. 5 (Final)


Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information in Nonfederal Systems and Organizations

NIST SP 800-171, Revision 2 issued on 1/28/2021 is an errata update. It is consistent with NIST procedures and criteria for errata updates, whereby a new copy of a final publication is issued to include corrections that do not alter existing or introduce new technical information or requirements. Such corrections are intended to remove ambiguity and improve interpretation of the work, and may also be used to improve readability or presentation (e.g., formatting, grammar, spelling).

Specifically in SP 800-171, Revision 2, an existing paragraph was moved to an earlier section to emphasize existing relevant supplemental guidance about the applicability of the security requirements. The changes in the applicability paragraph are editorial in nature and do not impact the publication's scope or implementation, nor introduce new technical information.

Documentation > Supplemental Material > CUI SSP template:

** There is no prescribed format or specified level of detail for system security plans. However, organizations ensure that the required information in [SP 800-171 Requirement] 3.12.4 is conveyed in those plans.

Author(s)

Ron Ross (NIST) , Victoria Pillitteri (NIST) , Kelley Dempsey (NIST) , Mark Riddle (NARA) , Gary Guissanie (IDA)

Abstract

The protection of Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) resident in nonfederal systems and organizations is of paramount importance to federal agencies and can directly impact the ability of the federal government to successfully conduct its essential missions and functions. This publication provides agencies with recommended security requirements for protecting the confidentiality of CUI when the information is resident in nonfederal systems and organizations when the nonfederal organization is not collecting or maintaining information on behalf of a federal agency or using or operating a system on behalf of an agency and where there are no specific safeguarding requirements for protecting the confidentiality of CUI prescribed by the authorizing law, regulation, or governmentwide policy for the CUI category listed in the CUI Registry. The requirements apply to all components of nonfederal systems and organizations that process, store, and/or transmit CUI, or that provide protection for such components. The security requirements are intended for use by federal agencies in contractual vehicles or other agreements established between those agencies and nonfederal organizations.

The protection of Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) resident in nonfederal systems and organizations is of paramount importance to federal agencies and can directly impact the ability of the federal government to successfully conduct its essential missions and functions. This publication provides agencies with recommended security requirements for protecting the confidentiality of CUI when the information is resident in nonfederal systems and organizations when the nonfederal organization is not collecting or maintaining information on behalf of a federal agency or using or operating a system on behalf of an agency and where there are no specific safeguarding requirements for protecting the confidentiality of CUI prescribed by the authorizing law, regulation, or governmentwide policy for the CUI category listed in the CUI Registry. The requirements apply to all components of nonfederal systems and organizations that process, store, and/or transmit CUI, or that provide protection for such components. The security requirements are intended for use by federal agencies in contractual vehicles or other agreements established between those agencies and nonfederal organizations.

Keywords

Control Families

Access Control Audit and Accountability Awareness and Training Configuration Management Identification and Authentication Maintenance Media Protection Personnel Security Physical and Environmental Protection System and Communications Protection System and Information Integrity

Documentation

Other Parts of this Publication:
SP 800-171A

Document History:
01/28/21: SP 800-171 Rev. 2 (Final)


About the competition

 The first, in 1958, included two categories – piano and violin. Beginning with the second competition, in 1962, a cello category was added, and the vocal division was introduced during the third competition in 1966. In 1990, a fifth category was announced for the IX International Tchaikovsky Competition – a contest for violin makers which was held before the main competition.

In 2011, the Competition was first held in two cities, Moscow and St. Petersburg. The 15 th , jubilee competition was timed to the 175 th anniversary of the birth of the great Russian composer.

In 2018, the International Tchaikovsky Competition reached its 60th anniversary. Throughout its history, the Competition has given international fame to outstanding representatives of the performing arts of the modern era. 

An artistic competition is a traditional starting point for gifted young musicians as it gives them a chance to encounter the admiration of an audience, be initiated into the worldwide professional community, and start a brilliant international career.

Past editions have spawned such renowned musicians as pianists Van Cliburn, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Mikhail Pletnev, Grigory Sokolov, Denis Matsuev, Daniil Trifonov violinists Gidon Kremer, Victoria Mullova, Vladimir Spivakov, Viktor Tretiakov, Pavel Milyukov cellists Mario Brunello, David Geringas, Natalia Gutman, Antonio Meneses and singers Vladimir Atlantov, Elena Obraztsova, Evgeny Nesterenko, Paata Burchuladze, Deborah Voigt, Yulia Matochkina, Ariunbaatar Ganbaatar.

The competition was held in Moscow and St. Petersburg from June 17 to June 29, 2019.


Find errors with the Log Reader Agent

The Log Reader Agent connects to your publisher database and scans the transaction log for any transactions that are marked "for replication." It then adds those transactions to the distribution database.

Connect to the publisher in SQL Server Management Studio. Expand the server node, right-click the Replication folder, and then select Launch Replication Monitor:

Replication Monitor opens:

The red X indicates that the publication is not synchronizing. Expand My Publishers on the left side, and then expand the relevant publisher server.

Select the AdvWorksProductTrans publication on the left, and then look for the red X on one of the tabs to identify where the issue is. In this case, the red X is on the Agents tab, so one of the agents is encountering an error:

Select the Agents tab to identify which agent is encountering the error:

This view shows you two agents, the Snapshot Agent and the Log Reader Agent. The one that's encountering an error has the red X. In this case, it's the Log Reader Agent.

Double-click the line that's reporting the error to open the agent history for the Log Reader Agent. This history provides more information about the error:

The error typically occurs when the owner of the publisher database is not set correctly. This can happen when a database is restored. To verify this:

a. Expand Databases in Object Explorer.

b. Right-click AdventureWorks2012 > Properties.

c. Verify that an owner exists under the Files page. If this box is blank, this is the likely cause of your issue.

If the owner is blank on the Files page, open a New Query window within the context of the AdventureWorks2012 database. Run the following T-SQL code:

You might need to restart the Log Reader Agent:

a. Expand the SQL Server Agent node in Object Explorer and open Job Activity Monitor.

b. Sort by Category and identify the Log Reader Agent by the REPL-LogReader category.

c. Right-click the Log Reader Agent job and select Start Job at Step.

Validate that your publication is now synchronizing by opening Replication Monitor again. If it's not already open, you can find it by right-clicking Replication in Object Explorer.

Select the AdvWorksProductTrans publication, select the Agents tab, and double-click the Log Reader Agent to open the agent history. You should now see that the Log Reader Agent is running and either is replicating commands or has "no replicated transactions":


Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation

Delta Lake State Park is located on a peninsula extending into Delta Reservoir. You'll find the terrain is wooded and generally flat. Year-round visitors can enjoy the day in one of many picnic areas, or on one of the many hiking and nature trails. There is also a boat launch and shoreline fishing for trout, pike, bass, bullhead and perch. Campers can enjoy 101 tent, trailer or RV camping sites and there is a sandy beach with swimming in the summer. For winter visitors there are cross-country ski trails.

Thanks to a grant from the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a Hippocampe Beach/All Terrain wheelchair is now available at Delta Lake State Park to access beach and trails.

Pavilion Information
Delta Lake has ten pavilions/tents. Prices range from $50 to $200 and can accommodate 50 to 168 people. Check availability at ReserveAmerica.com

Pet Policy: A maximum of two pets are allowed in campsites and day use areas unless prohibited by sign or directive. Pets are to be supervised at all times and either be crated or on a leash not more than 6-feet in length. Proof of rabies inoculation shall be produced if requested by staff. Pets are not permitted in playgrounds, buildings, golf courses, boardwalks, pools and spray-grounds or guarded beaches (this does not apply to service animals).

Hours of Operation

  • Open year-round, dawn to dusk.
  • Shelter Rentals:
    Available for use mid-May to Columbus Day, 9 a.m. - sunset.

2021 Camping season: 5/21/21 - 10/10/21

Tent & trailer sites available. 101 campsites, max. 6 people/site, minimum 2 night stay. Limitations in place. Contact Reserve America for details.


Introduction

Definition

Acute stroke evaluation and management is fundamentally predicated on time from symptom onset. 1,2 Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nonsurgical reperfusion therapy for acute stroke with evidence-based efficacy, and well-designed, adequately powered studies have consistently shown that efficacy is exquisitely time sensitive. 3 𠄷 That being the case, knowledge of the exact time of symptom onset, or at least the time at which the patient was last known to be normal, is paramount.

Patients who go to sleep normal and awaken with stroke symptoms, a phenomenon known as “wake-up stroke,” present a management dilemma for acute stroke providers. Sometimes the period of sleep is short and a patient can still be eligible for tPA based on standard time-based criteria however, when the time at which the patient was last known to be normal is the night prior to a morning presentation, which is often the case, the acute stroke provider is left without the key time-based data by which one typically makes safe therapeutic decisions for tPA candidacy. This makes for a diagnostic and therapeutic “gray area” in acute stroke practice.

Epidemiology

The wake-up stroke phenomenon is common. Numerous studies of various size and methodological strength through the years have given a sense of actual incidence of wake-up stroke as compared to other stroke presentations. These mostly stroke-registry�sed studies range in estimation of wake-up stroke incidence from 8% in California 8 to 33% in a region of France 9 to nearly 39% in Ohio 10 but most typically suggest somewhere in between 15% and 25%. 11 � Clinical and radiographic characteristics distinguishing wake-up stroke from other modes of stroke onset have been sought, but results have been conflicting. Some older studies have suggested that wake-up strokes seem to be more severe at onset 14,19 and portend a worse outcome overall, 17,19 while others suggested there are no appreciable clinical or radiographic differences between wake-up and “while awake” strokes. 16,22,25 �

The best estimate of wake-up stroke prevalence comes from a retrospective population-based study of 1854 acute ischemic strokes in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region. In this representative biracial sample, 273 (14.3%) of acute strokes were wake-up strokes, resulting in an adjusted event rate of 26.0/100 000. No clinically significant differences in baseline characteristics were observed between wake-up and nonwake-up strokes however, patients with wake-up stroke were older (72.3 vs 70.0 years, P = .01) and had higher baseline retrospectively calculated National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores (4 vs 3, P = .004). Importantly, 98 (35%) patients were otherwise eligible for tPA if time was not a factor. 27

Overall, in spite of the methodological heterogeneity and different focus of published studies, the common theme is that wake-up stroke is not rare and the clinical features suggest that there is a place for therapeutic optimism although, no definitive clinical or radiographic paradigm has yet been established to select wake-up stroke candidates for safe and efficacious reperfusion therapy ( Table 1 ).

Table 1.

Wake-Up Stroke Characteristics by Study.

AuthorsStudy DesignTotal PatientsWake-Up Stroke #, %Clinical Differences vs While-Awake StrokeOutcome Differences vs While-Awake StrokeImaging
CASPR group 8 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, US state registry37430 (8)
Michel et al 9 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry1633568 (33.1)
Tanimoto et al 10 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry7228 (38.9)WUS: tended to be African American, younger, small vessel mechanism, less severe NIHSS, worse lipid profile
Marler et al 11 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry1167331 (28)
Ricci et al 12 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, regional registry37568 (18.1)
Lago et al 13 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry1223309 (25.2)
Bornstein et al 14 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, national registry1671311 (18.6)WUS more severe
Chaturvedi et al 15 Subanalysis of prospective RCT1272323 (25.4)
Serena et al 16 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, national registry1248301 (24.1)NoneWUS: CT head normal in 39.4% of patients seen within 6 hours of symptom recognition (60% in stroke while awake)
Nadeau et al 17 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, national registry2585349 (13.5)WUS had higher BP and ischemic stroke subtypeWUS less likely to return home
Boode et al 18 Retrospective, hospital registry26348 (18.3)
Jiménez-Conde et al 19 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry813127 (15.6)WUS had more obesity, less AF, and higher initial stroke severityWUS had worse 3-month outcome
Silva et al 20 Prospective cohort study, hospital registry676131 (19.4)NoneNoneSimilar prevalence of CTP mismatch and arterial occlusion in WUS and known onset groups
Turin et al 21 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, national registry89787 (9.7)WUS more hypertension and increased initial severityNone
Fink et al 22 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry364100 (27)NoneSimilar prevalence of MRI DWI/PWI mismatch
Moradiya et al 23 Subanalysis of a prospective RCT17 3985152 (29.6)WUS initially less severeNone
Koton et al 24 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, national registry4408820 (18.6)NoneNone20%-40% prevalence of penumbra
Todo et al 25 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry15817 (10.8)CT findings in WUS similar to patients within 3 hours of known symptom onset
Huisa et al 26 Prospective cohort study, hospital registry9628 (29.6)NoneTrend toward favorable (0-1) 90 d mRS in WUS vs 4 hours from symptoms controls (73% vs 45%)Favorable CT ASPECTS (8-10) similar in WUS and known 4 h from symptoms (89.3% vs 95.6%)
Mackey et al 27 Population-based registry1854273 (14.7)“Minor differences” in age and rNIHSS (WUS older, higher rNIHSS)None
Roveri et al 28 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry1531190 (12.4)NoneOutcome better in controls (patients treated with tPA within 3 hours of symptoms)Baseline ASPECTS similar in WUS and controls within 3 hours of symptoms and treated with tPA
Manawadu et al 29 Retrospective, prospectively collected data, hospital registry1836193 (10.5)Outcome better in thrombolyzed WUS vs nonthrombolyzed WUSCT ASPECTS and CTP to select patients for IV tPA

Abbreviations: WUS, wake-up stroke RCT, randomized controlled trial CT, computed tomography CTP, CT perfusion MRI, magnetic resonance imaging DWI, diffusion-weighted imaging PWI, perfusion-weighted imaging ASPECTS, Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score rNIHSS, retrospective National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale BP, blood pressure AF, atrial fibrillation.

Pathophysiologic Hypotheses

The wake-up stroke phenomenon is incompletely understood pathophysiologically. What seems clear, though, is that wake-up strokes are not actuarial quirks of evenly spread stroke risk through the course of a day but likely the result of circadian changes in coagulability, serum catecholamine levels, and autonomic tone. Much like cardiac events, 30 there is a preponderance of strokes of all subtypes in the morning as compared to evening onset. 11,31 Several homeostatic and structural factors may contribute to this phenomenon. Proposed factors include sleep-disordered breathing with or without patent foramen ovale, 32 � overnight changes in autonomic tone affecting blood pressure with morning surges, 35,36 morning increases in platelet aggregation 37,38 relatively refractory to clopidogrel, 39 endothelial dysfunction, 40 blood viscosity, 41 and fluctuating prothrombotic/fibrinolytic factor level balance. 42 � The circadian blood pressure-related changes behind the morning “surges,” which essentially mirror stroke incidence through the course of a day, are a tempting therapeutic target. Given the preponderance of strokes of all types between 0600 and 1200, 31 a treatment trial targeting morning blood pressure changes did not change the distribution of strokes through the course of a day. 45 Lending credence to the contribution of overnight paroxysms of atrial fibrillation, 46 a recent study demonstrated a significant association between wake-up stroke and a new diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. 47 Given the heterogeneity of wake-up stroke subtypes, it is likely that no one factor underlies wake-up stroke but some combination of the aforementioned and other yet undiscovered contributors ( Table 2 ).


The Best Gun of WWII – Flak 88 in photos

The Flak 88 was a legendary WWII-era anti-air and an anti-tank gun used by Nazi Germany and their allies.

The predecessor of this iconic gun was produced by Krupp during the First World War, designated as 8.8 cm Flak 16, as one of the first specially designed AA cannons, it soon showed results in countering the swarm of newly-developed aircraft which were conquering the skies above Europe. However, the German Empire suffered a crushing defeat, forcing extreme budget cuts on its military.

Anti aircraft gun Flak 88

Despite the Treaty of Versaille forbidding the German military to produce such heavy weapons in the interwar period, the 88 series were constantly improved and developed. The semi-automatic loading system made it easy to use since the shells would be disposed of by levers and the loader would insert the second shell.

But the trick in producing any functional anti-aircraft gun was in achieving high muzzle velocity while firing heavy projectiles high into the air. This was the main trait of every Flak 88 model ― from its introduction in 1917 to the late-WWII versions adapted for heavy tanks and tank destroyers such as the Tiger and Jagdpanther.

88 mm gun eighty-eight 8.8 cm Flak. Photo: Joost J. Bakker IJmuiden / CC BY 2.0

In 1933, when the Nazis seized power, the 8.8 cm Flak 18 was put into mass production. What followed were improved versions created in 1936, 1937, and ultimately in 1941. The 8.8 cm Flak 41 became the symbol of air defense in Nazi Germany as its powerful 20 lb (9.4-kilogram) shell was capable of knocking down Allied bombers and fighters at an altitude of more than 26,240 ft (8000 m).

Once the Wehrmacht realized the scale of firepower which the 88 caliber had to offer, projects were initiated to produce an anti-tank version called the 8.8 cm PaK 43 and to fit the gun onto tanks. Besides impenetrable armor, the 88 gun designated as the 8.8 cm KwK 36 and later the KwK 43 tank gun was the main advantage which made the Tiger tanks so dreaded by Allied servicemen.

88mm flak AA gun

Although its primary use was to ward off invading high-altitude bombers by using high-explosive ammo, on the ground the 88 caliber had a devastating effect, once supplied with armor-piercing shells and a variety of anti-tank projectiles.

Its successful service history is perhaps best described in the words of an American historian and WWII veteran. Paul Fussell wrote that American troops knew that the greatest single weapon of the war, the atomic bomb excepted, was the German 88-mm flat-trajectory gun, which brought down thousands of bombers and tens of thousands of soldiers. The Allies had nothing as good.

8.8cm Flak. Photo: Mark Pellegrini / CC BY-SA 2.5 Flak 18 88 30 German Flak 18 88 mm anti aircraft artillery Flak 8,8 cm Flak Crew Paint Victory Kill Rings Flak 18 88mm gun Flak 88 gun ready to firing against aircraft Flak 88 Regiment 24 Artemowsk Winter 1941 Two 88 mm anti-aircraft guns stands ready for action. German 88 mm Artillery Flak 18 German anti aircraft gun Flak Flak 88 1944 Gobschelwitz Leipzig Germany A burnt out German 88 mm FlaK 36 gun and its SdKfz 8 half track near El Alamein, Egypt.

Flak 18 88 wwii artillery


Adrian Ionita Chindia Târgovişte videos, transfer history and stats - SofaScore

Adrian Ionita is 21 years old (11/03/2000) and he is 178cm tall. Adrian Ionita prefers to play with left foot.

Adrian Ionita statistics and career statistics, live SofaScore ratings, Heatmap and goal video highlights may be available on SofaScore for some of Adrian Ionita and Chindia Târgovişte matches. Adrian Ionita previous match for Chindia Târgovişte was against FC Viitorul Constanța in Liga 1, Europe Playoffs, and the match ended with result 2 - 3. ( FC Viitorul Constanța won the match ).

Adrian Ionita football player profile displays all matches and competitions with statistics for all the matches he played in. Most important stats for each competition, including average SofaScore rating, matches played, goals, assists, cards and other relevant data are also displayed.

SofaScore, football livescore uses a unique algorithm to generate Adrian Ionita SofaScore rating based on detailed statistics, analyses and our own knowledge.

SofaScore livescore is available as an iPhone and iPad app, Android app on Google Play and Windows phone app. You can find us in all stores on different languages searching for "SofaScore". Install the SofaScore app and follow all Adrian Ionita matches live on your mobile!


How Do You Find the ISP Settings on a Computer?

Finding the ISP settings on a Windows computer typically requires navigating the Network settings in the Control Panel. The process can vary slightly, depending on the version of the Windows operating system. However, it should only take a few minutes to obtain the ISP settings

Open the Start menu, highlight Settings and click Control Panel. Double-click the Network icon to open the Network window that shows the computer's installed components.

In the Network window, select TCP/IP, and click Properties. Select the IP address tab. If an IP address and subnet mask are present, your account uses a static IP address. If there is no address, your account is based on a dynamically assigned IP address.

Write down the IP address and subnet mask information for the static IP address. If no address is present, select the option that allows you to obtain the IP address automatically and assign it to the account.

Click on the Gateway tab. Write down the IP address under Installed Gateways if one is present. Select the DNS Configuration tab, and write down any DNS server addresses that may be present.


Watch the video: Generalul Emil Străinu Rupe Tăcerea Maesj Urgent Adresat Românilor și Președintelui Klaus Ioha


Comments:

  1. Nell

    What touching words :)

  2. Adron

    And is not infinitely distant :)

  3. Trevan

    Attempt not torture.

  4. Malakazahn

    Yes, it is written well, it really happens. How interesting, just yesterday I was grinding this topic with a friend while sitting in the kitchen with a glass of cognac.

  5. Cipactli

    What necessary phrase... super, a brilliant idea

  6. Kigabar

    It looks like him.

  7. Tantalus

    He has gone to the forum and has seen this topic. Let him help you?



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