Dragonet SS-293 - History

Dragonet SS-293 - History


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Dragonet

A family of fishes found in the warm seas of the world.

(SS 293 dp. 1,626, 1. 311'8", b. 27'3", dr. 15'3", o. 20
k.; cgl. 66; a. 1 4", 10 21" tt.; cl. Gato)

Dragonet (SS-293) was launched 18 April 1943 by Cramp Shipbuilding Co., Philadelphia, Pa., sponsored by Mrs. J. E. Gingrich; and commissioned 6 March 1944, Commander J. H. Lewis in command.

Dragonet reached Pearl Harbor from New London 9 October 1944, and put out on her first war patrol 1 November, bound for the Kurile Islands and the Sea of Okohotsk. On the morning of 15 December 1944, while submerged south of Matsuwa, Dragonet struck an uncharted submerged pinnacle, which holed her pressure hull in the forward torpedo room. The space was completely flooded, and in order to surface the submarine, it was necessary to blow water out of the compartment with compressed air. At 0845 she surfaced, just 4 miles from the airfield on Matsuwa, and set course to clear the danger area as quickly as possible. Her bow planes were rigged out, and in order to brnig them, it would be necessary to enter the flooded compartment. Next day this was accomplished by putting pressure in the forward battery compartment, and opening the water-tight door into the forward torpedo room. The determination and skill of her crew were further tried when she had to run through 2 days of storm to reach Midway 20 December for emergency repairs.

After overhaul at Mare Island, Dragonet returned to Pearl Harbor 2 April 1945, and sailed on her next patrol 19 April. She called at Guam to refuel from 1 to 3 May, then proceeded to lifeguard duty south of the Japanese home islands. She rescued four downed Army aviators during this patrol, and returned to refit at Guam between 10 June and 8 July.

Dragonet's third war patrol, between 8 July 1945 and 17 August, was a combination of lifeguard duty and offensive against Japanese shipping in Bungo Suido. At this late stage in the war, the remnants of the Japanese merchant marine provided few targets, and none was contacted by Dragonet. She rescued a downed naval aviator near Okino Shima. Putting in to Saipan at the close of the war, she sailed on to Pearl Harbor and San Francisco. She was decommissioned and placed in reserve at Mare Island 16 April 1946.

Dragonet's second and third war patrols were designated as "successful." She received two battle stars for World War II service.


USS Dragonet (SS-293)

Die USS Dragonet (SS/AGSS-293) war ein U-Boot der Balao-Klasse. Es wurde von der US Navy während des Zweiten Weltkriegs ab Ende 1944 von der Pazifikflotte in Operationen gegen Japan eingesetzt. Während des Kalten Krieges wurde das U-Boot bis 1. April 1961 in Reserve gehalten. Seine letzte Funktion war die eines Versuchsschiffs für Sprengtests.

1526 ts aufgetaucht
2424 ts getaucht

4× 1350 PS-Fairbanks-Morse Model 38D8-1/8 9-Zylinder-
Diesel-Gegenkolbenmotoren (ges. 5400 PS)
4× 685-PS-Elektromotoren
(ges. 2740 PS) [2]

20,25 Knoten aufgetaucht
8,75 Knoten getaucht

10× 53,3 cm Torpedorohre
(6 im Bug 4 im Heck)
1× 12,7 cm Bordgeschütz
1× 4,0 cm Bofors FlaK
1× 20 mm Oerlikon MK [3]


William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding Company (also known as William Cramp & Sons Ship & Engine Building Company) of Philadelphia was founded in 1830 by William Cramp, and was the preeminent U.S. iron shipbuilder of the late 19th century.

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.


Dragonet SS-293 - History

Spikefish

(SS-404: dp. 1 810 (surf.), 2,415 (subm.), 1. 311'8 b. 27'3 dr. 15'3", s. 20 k. (surf.), 8.75 k. (subm.)cpl. 81 a. 10 21 tt., 1 5, 1 40mm. cl Balao)

Spikefish (SS-404) was laid down on 29 January 1944 by the Portsmouth (N.H.) Navy Yard, launched on 26 April 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Harvey W. Moore and commissioned on 30 June 1944, Comdr. N. J. Nicholas in command.

She outfitted there until 31 July when she moved to the Portsmouth-New London area for training. The submarine departed Portsmouth on 16 September and proceeded via the Panama Canal to the Hawaiian Islands. Upon arriving at Pearl Harbor on 23 October she began reparation for her first war patrol.

got underway on 15 November 1944 for the Kuril Islands and the Sea of Okhotsk. She encountered no enemy shipping during the patrol which ended at Midway Island on 1 January 1945. On 26 January, she sailed for the Ryukyus and began patrolling westward of that group. On 24 February, the submarine made a submerged attack on a convoy of six cargo ships with four escorts. She fired six torpedoes at two of the freighters, three of which were heard to hit, but results were not observed as Spikefish was forced to go deep and weather out a four-hour attack of about 80 depth charges. She sighted another convoy on 5 March and expended six torpedoes in a fruitless attack which led to another pounding by escorts. Spikefish was ordered to terminate her patrol on 6 March, and she returned to Pearl Harbor on the 19th.

One month later, Spikefish and Dragonet (SS-293) sailed for Guam, topped off with fuel, and proceeded independently, on 3 May, toward an area off the east coast of Formosa where she assumed lifeguard station duties. She made no rescues during this period and sighted only one enemy ship. That occurred on the night of 14 May, and all four torpedoes that she fired missed the target. On the 29th, Spikefish was ordered to take station off Sakishima Gunto and act as lifeguard for carrier planes in the area. On 5 June, she bombarded Miyara airstrip on Ishigaki Jima with her 5 inch gun. Two days later, the submarine rescued a downed pilot whose plane had crashed after taking off from escort carrier, Sargent Bay (CVE-83). She returned to Guam on the 13th.

Spikefish began her last war patrol on 8 July with an uneventful patrol in the Yellow Sea and lifeguard duty off Shanghai. On the 24th, she bombarded Surveyor Island, off the China coast, in an attempt to destroy an enemy radar station. Shortly after midnight on 11 August, she located a small Japanese cargo ship near her lifeguard station but could not make positive identification at night. The ship was dead in the water so Spikefish waited until morning, identified it as enemy, and sank it with gunfire. Three survivors were brought on board. On the night of 13 August, she made radar contact with a surfaced submarine. After tracking it for about an hour, the submarine submerged and disappeared from Spikefish's scope. At 0007, contact was regained and the submarine was tracked until morning, when she was sighted on the surface. Her silhouette proved her to be Japanese. Spikefish fired six torpedoes. Two hit the target which sank in a cloud of smoke. The sole survivor who was taken prisoner, identified the submarine as 1-373.

On 15 August, an order was received to cease all attacks as Japan had agreed to surrender. The submarine delivered her prisoners to Saipan on 21 August and proceeded to Pearl Harbor. On 6 September, she and Hoe (SS-258) sailed for the east coast of the United States. Spikefish transited the Panama Canal on 23 September and arrived at New London, Conn. on the 29th. She was in drydock at the Portsmouth (N.H.) Navy Yard from 1 November 1945 to 15 February 1946. Upon her return to New London, her home port, she was assigned to Submarine Squadron 2 and trained personnel of the submarine school.

Her training duty was interrupted by an overhaul from 7 April to 22 September 1947 a cruise to Bermuda from 25 September to 2 October 1947, and another overhaul at Philadelphia from 16 May to 8 July 1948. Spikefish operated from New London making training cruises along the east coast from Bermuda to Nova Scotia until 30 April 1955. On that day she and Piper (SS-409) sailed for the Mediterranean and deployment with the 6th Fleet. Spikefish returned to New London on 8 October 1955 and resumed her normal training duties until early 1963. On 18 March 1960, Spikefish became the first United States submarine to record 10,000 dives.

Spikefish was decommissioned on 2 April 1963 and was struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1963. She was subsequently sunk as a target


Stars in Service: Famous Entertainers in the US Navy and Coast Guard

Many entertainers and future celebrities answered their country's call and donned US Navy and Coast Guard blues, serving at sea during the war.

Lieutenant Commander Quinton McHale, The Joker, Jed Clampett. What do these TV names possibly have in common? Long before commanding a Patrol Torpedo boat, wreaking havoc in Gotham City, and discovering “black gold,” Ernest Borgnine, Cesar Romero, and Buddy Ebsen all served in either the US Navy or Coast Guard during World War II.

Many famous actors went to war, and most are familiar with the service of men like Jimmy Stewart, Clark Gable, and Henry Fonda. Those we know as celebrities now joined at different points in their careers. Paul Newman joined the navy in 1943, just out of high school. Gene Kelly took a leave of absence from his contract with MGM to join the navy in 1944. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. had a long list of successful film credits to his name when seeing war clouds on the horizon in April 1941, he was commissioned into the US Naval Reserve. The list is long of those who served in the sea going forces, so here are a few highlights.

John Coltrane

Long before becoming a jazz great, John Coltrane joined the US Naval Reserve on August 6, 1945. Not quite 21, Coltrane wanted to avoid being drafted into the army. After boot camp Coltrane was shipped out to Hawaii, where he performed as a guest with the Melody Masters. The group was a white-only band, so Coltrane could only perform with the group as a guest. Discharged just a year later in August 1946, Coltrane returned to Philadelphia and plunged into what would be a very successful music career.

Aspiring musician John Coltrane in his enlistment photo. His enlistment paperwork indicates he played several instruments and had an interest in pursuing music. From Coltrane's Official Military Personnel File, the National Archives, St. Louis.

Tony Curtis

Known professionally as Tony Curtis, but born Bernard Schwartz to Hungarian Jewish parents in New York City, Curtis joined the US Navy in 1943. Despite nearly flunking out of high school, Curtis qualified for signal school and became a Signalman Third Class. Inspired by films glorifying submarine service, Curtis applied for sub school. He was accepted, but was assigned to a sub tender, the USS Proteus (AS-19) instead of a submarine. The Proteus was stationed in Guam, where Curtis also worked as part of a relief crew readying the USS Dragonet (SS-293) to return to sea. Through binoculars, the future star watched in Tokyo Bay as the peace treaty was signed aboard the USS Missouri on September 2, 1945. Returning home to New York, Curtis used the GI Bill to attend acting school before moving to California in 1948. Success came quickly, and in 1959, Curtis starred with fellow navy veteran Jack Lemmon in the classic comedy, Some Like it Hot.

Cesar Romero

Cuban American actor and dancer Cesar Romero appeared in various productions on Broadway before moving on to Hollywood. Despite a successful acting career, Romero joined the US Coast Guard in October 1942. Assigned to the transport ship USS Cavalier (APA-37), Romero’s was Boatswain’s Mate, and he eventually became Chief Boatswain’s Mate. Romero was aboard the Cavalier in support of the landings on Saipan in June 1944 and helped unload reinforcements. As part of the crew of the Cavalier, Romero participated in the invasion of Tinian, and saw action in the Lingayen Gulf during the Philippines campaign. On January 30, 1945, the Cavalier was hit by a torpedo from a Japanese submarine. The crew saved the ship, which had to be towed to Pearl Harbor for repairs. Upon his return to the United States, Romero was sent on a series of speaking and bond-selling tours. Everywhere he went he drew massive crowds. Romero returned to Hollywood after the war, playing parts in feature films. He is remembered by many as the colorful nemesis to Adam West’s Batman—the Joker.

Cesar Romero made Chief Petty Officer while in the US Coast Guard. Courtesy of the US Coast Guard.

Ernest Borgnine

Long before he became a beloved actor, Ernest Borgnine, born Ermes Borgnino, joined the navy after graduating from high school in 1935. He was discharged in 1941, but reenlisted after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Borgnine served until the end of the war aboard USS Sylph (PY-12), a yacht which had been converted for use in anti-submarine warfare. Aboard the Sylph, which operated in the Atlantic, Borgnine rose to the rank of Gunner’s Mate First Class. After the war he returned home to Connecticut, where his mother suggested that he try acting. After performing on stage for several years Borgnine broke into film, and in 1955 he won an Academy Award for best actor, beating out James Dean and James Cagney. He starred in classics such as The Wild Bunch and The Dirty Dozen, but for many, Borgnine will always be remembered as Lieutenant Commander McHale, commanding officer of the ragtag crew of PT-73 in the television series McHale's Navy.

USS Sylph, the converted yacht used for anti-submarine warfare in the Atlantic Ocean. Borgnine served aboard the vessel for the duration of his enlistment in World War II. Courtesy of Naval History and Heritage Command.

Buddy Ebsen

Born Christian Ebsen, but known professionally as Buddy, Ebsen got his professional start in 1928. Originally from Florida, Ebsen and his sister Vilma performed together as a vaudeville act in in New York City. They moved to Hollywood in the mid-1930s, where they parted ways when Vilma married. Ebsen’s musical talents landed him roles in films with stars such as Shirley Temple. Originally cast as the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz, the aluminum makeup made Ebsen seriously ill and he lost the part. An avid sailor, Ebsen attempted numerous times to obtain a commission in the US Navy before he was successfully commissioned as a Lieutenant (junior grade) in the US Coast Guard. Assigned to the USS Pocatello as the damage control officer, Ebsen greatly improved the crew’s morale when he started creating shows, writing material and involving the crew in productions. The shows were a hit, and a huge relief from the monotony of their work as a weather ship in the Pacific Ocean. Ebsen never saw combat and was discharged in 1946. His career slowly picked up, and in 1962 he began his famous role as Jed Clampett in The Beverly Hillbillies.

Before he was Jed Clampett, Ebsen, shown here in his US Coast Guard uniform, was Lieutenant Ebsen. Courtesy of the US Coast Guard.

As the saying goes, “art imitates life,” and many actors throughout the decades have portrayed military personnel in films with an uncanny realism. Their experiences serving in the US Armed Forces gave them a first-hand understanding of the quirks of military life, and some of the best portrayals have come from their experiences. Jimmy Stewart experienced flashbacks during the filming of It’s a Wonderful Life, some of which made it in the final cut. The realistic portrayal of the 327th Glider Infantry Regiment in Battleground was due to many of the actors having served in parachute regiments. In the John Wayne classic They Were Expendable, the patrol torpedo boat crews were played by actual PT boat sailors on leave after their boats had been sunk in the Mediterranean. Next time you watch a classic war film, just remember, there’s likely a veteran onscreen.

For more on celebrities in the military in World War II, listen to the Museum’s podcast Service on Celluloid. An actor's military service is often the subject of discussions examining Hollywood's portrayals—good and bad—of the 20th century’s most dramatic event.

Mission: Jimmy Stewart and the Fight for Europe

For more on the life of Jimmy Stewart, read Mission: Jimmy Stewart and the Fight for Europe. What emerges in Mission is the story of a Jimmy Stewart you never knew until now, a story more fantastic than any he brought to the screen.


USS Dragonet (SS-293)

Dragonet (SS-293) was launched 18 April 1943 by Cramp Shipbuilding Co., Philadelphia sponsored by Mrs. J. E. Gingrich and commissioned 6 March 1944, Commander Jack Hayden Lewis in command.

Dragonet was depth charged during a series of controlled tests in April, May and June 1944 off Portsmouth, New Hampshire. [7]

Dragonet reached Pearl Harbor from New London 9 October 1944, and put out on her first war patrol 1 November, bound for the Kurile Islands and the Sea of Okhotsk. On the morning of 15 December 1944, while submerged south of Matsuwa, Dragonet struck an uncharted submerged pinnacle, which holed her pressure hull in the forward torpedo room. The space was completely flooded, and in order to surface the submarine, it was necessary to blow water out of the compartment with compressed air. At 0845 she surfaced, just 4 miles (6.4 km) from the airfield on Matsuwa, and set course to clear the danger area as quickly as possible. Her bow planes were rigged out, and in order to rerig them, it would be necessary to enter the flooded compartment. Next day this was accomplished by putting pressure in the forward battery compartment, and opening the water-tight door into the forward torpedo room. The determination and skill of her crew were further tried when she had to run through two days of storm to reach Midway 20 December for emergency repairs.

After overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, CA., Dragonet returned to Pearl Harbor 2 April 1945, and sailed on her next patrol 19 April. She called at Guam to refuel from 1 May to 3 May, then proceeded to lifeguard duty south of the Japanese home islands. She rescued four downed Army aviators during this patrol, and returned to refit at Guam between 10 June and 8 July.

Dragonet's third war patrol, between 8 July 1945 and 17 August, was a combination of lifeguard duty and offensive against Japanese shipping in Bungo Suido. At this late stage in the war, the remnants of the Japanese merchant marine provided few targets, and none was contacted by Dragonet. She rescued a downed naval aviator near Okino Shima. Putting into Saipan at the close of the war, she sailed on to Pearl Harbor and San Francisco.

Dragonet was decommissioned and placed in reserve at Mare Island 16 April 1946, and laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet. She was struck from the Naval Register 1 June 1961, and sunk by explosive test in Chesapeake Bay.

Dragonet's second and third war patrols were designated as "successful". She received two battle stars for World War II service.


Dragonet SS-293 - History

A family of fishes found in the warm seas of the world.

(SS - 293: dp. 1,526 l. 311'8" b. 27'3" dr. 15'3" s. 20 k. cpl. 66 a. 1 4", 10 21" tt. cl. Gato )

Dragonet (SS-293) was launched 18 April 1943 by Cramp Shipbuilding Co., Philadelphia, Pa. sponsored by Mrs. J. E. Gingrich and commissioned 6 March 1944, Commander J. H. Lewis in command.

Dragonet reached Pearl Harbor from New London 9 October 1944, and put out on her first war patrol 1 November, bound for the Kurile Islands and the Sea of Okohotsk [sic Okhotsk]. On the morning of 15 December 1944, while submerged south of Matsuwa, Dragonet struck an uncharted submerged pinnacle, which holed her pressure hull in the forward torpedo room. The space was completely flooded, and in order to surface the submarine, it was necessary to blow water out of the compartment with compressed air. At 0845 she surfaced, just 4 miles from the airfield on Matsuwa, and set course to clear the danger area as quickly as possible. Her bow planes were rigged out, and in order to rerig them, it would be necessary to enter the flooded compartment. Next day this was accomplished by putting pressure in the forward battery compartment, and opening the water-tight door into the forward torpedo room. The determination and skill of her crew were further tried when she had to run through 2 days of storm to reach Midway 20 December for emergency repairs.

After overhaul at Mare Island, Dragonet returned to Pearl Harbor 2 April 1945, and sailed on her next patrol 19 April. She called at Guam to refuel from 1 to 3 May, then proceeded to lifeguard duty south of the Japanese home islands. She rescued four downed Army aviators during this patrol, and returned to refit at Guam between 10 June and 8 July.

Dragonet's third war patrol, between 8 July 1945 and 17 August, was a combination of lifeguard duty and offensive against Japanese shipping in Bungo Suido. At this late stage in the war, the remnants of the Japanese merchant marine provided few targets, and none was contacted by Dragonet . She rescued a downed naval aviator near Okino Shima. Putting in to Saipan at the close of the war, she sailed on to Pearl Harbor and San Francisco. She was decommissioned and placed in reserve at Mare Island 16 April 1946.

Dragonet's second and third war patrols were designated as "successful." She received two battle stars for World War II service.


Cramp Wartime Slipway/Drydock Allocations

Because the records for Cramp are not easily available and are probably lost to history the shipyard image above was used to provide a fixed point in time for certain slipway allocations. This, combined with known keel laying and launching dates, allowed a tentative reconstruction of slipway occupation records.

They are certain for Cruisers, since only one can occupy the slipway at a time but Cramp used cruiser-size slipways to build four submarines at a time in each slipway so the Submarine slipway locations are uncertain. I've grouped submarines together by either keel laying dates or launch dates since they were launched en-masse since they inhabited the same slipway.


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These "little white bugs" (copepods and amphipods) are the food close to the bottom of the food chain in the ocean and are the natural food for mandarinfish as well as many other creatures. If you have a good population of these, mandarinfish should do quite well in your tank.


Watch the video: Introducing Captive Bred Baby Mandarin Dragonet and Feeding Challenges. Blue Reef Tank


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